Search

15 items found

  • Locations | Dr. Raj Khiani

    Wellington Hospital Circus Rd, St John's Wood, London NW8 9LE United Kingdom Clinic Hours : Monday 6 PM TO 8 PM The Wellington Hospital is the largest independent hospital in the UK and is part of the HCA hospital group. The hospital was founded by Dr Arthur Levin and was opened in April 1974. Source: Wikipedia Harley Street Clinic 35 Weymouth Street, Marylebone, London W1G 8BJ United Kingdom Clinic Hours : Arrange With Secretary The Harley Street Clinic is one of the nations leading private hospitals located in the centre of London. It is one of the few hospitals in the country to receive an "outstanding" CQC rating. Spire Bushey Hospital Heathbourne Road, Watford, Bushey, Hertfordshire WD23 1RD United Kingdom Clinic Hours : Monday 6 PM TO 8 PM Spire Healthcare is a leading independent hospital group located in the United Kingdom. The group works with experienced cardiologists in England Scotland and Wales. Source: Spire Healthcare The Royal Free Private Patient Unit 12th Floor, Royal Free Hospital, Pond St, Hampstead, London NW3 2QG United Kingdom Clinic Hours : Arrange With Secretary The Private Patient Unit is located on the 12th floor of the Royal Free hospital. The Royal Free is a teaching hospital and one of the leading hospitals in the country with world class expertise. Source: NHS The Saxon Clinic Chadwick Drive Eaglestone West , Milton Keynes MK6 5LR United Kingdom Clinic Hours : Wednesday 9AM to 4PM The Saxon Clinic is located in Milton Keynes adjacent to Milton Keynes University Hospital. It is the major provider for private healthcare for the city and the surrounding area. The Wellington Hospital Elstree Waterfront Beaufort house, The Waterfront Business Park, Elstree Rd, Elstree, Borehamwood WD6 3BS United Kingdom Clinic Hours : Tuesday 6PM to 8PM This hospital provides private healthcare in Elstree and the surrounding area and it is part of the Wellington hospital campus in St John's Wood. The hospital is part of the HCA hospital group Source: HCA Back to main page

  • Heart Failure | Dr. Raj Khiani | Special Interests

    Heart Failure What is heart failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart’s ability to pump blood and oxygen around the body is impaired. What are the symptoms of heart failure? The main symptoms include shortness of breath on exertion, swelling in the ankles, or abdomen and lower back because of fluid retention; as well as lethargy and weakness. What are the causes of heart failure? The most common cause of heart failure include heart attacks, high blood pressure and dilated cardiomyopathy (in which the main pumping chamber in the heart becomes enlarged and weakened). There are a large number of other causes of heart failure including valve disease, anaemia, thyroid disease, heart arrhythmias, cancer treatments such as chemotherapy, viral infection or excessive alcohol consumption. What tests will I need to diagnose heart failure? Your cardiologist will take a detailed history and examination and is then likely to move onto further tests, to confirm the diagnosis of heart failure. There a number of tests which can be done to diagnose heart failure. The basic tests include an ECG and echocardiogram (echo) . Further tests might be necessary to look into the causes in more detail and these might include: a cardiac MRI, an angiogram of the heart arteries and a holter monitor. These tests will be organised in selective patients after detailed discussion with your cardiologist. What treatments are available for patients with heart failure? While heart failure is a serious heart condition, your quality and quantity of life can be significantly improved by a number of possible treatments. This might include: Medication Regular medication such as beta-blockers, diuretics and blood pressure medication can be helpful. They need to be started cautiously and the doses gradually increased with careful monitoring of your blood pressure and blood tests (such as kidney function). These tablets are usually taken life-long but together they can have very significant impacts on reducing both the symptoms of heart failure and improving life-expectancy for patients with heart failure. Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter defibrillators In some patients pacemakers maybe helpful in reducing the symptoms of heart failure and reducing the risk of hospitalisation with symptoms of heart failure. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are sophisticated types of pacemakers, which can treat dangerous slow or dangerous fast heart rhythms, in patients with heart failure. This can be done either because the patients has suffered from a dangerous heart rhythm already (secondary prevention) or because their cardiologist believes they are at risk of developing dangerous heart rhythms in the future (primary prevention). The ICD can be combined with a pacemaker in a device called CRTD and this device can help improve both quality and quantity of life as well. Further information about pacemakers and ICDs can be seen in the pacemaker section of this website. How can I help keep my heart healthy? There are a number of life-style changes you can make to keep your heart as healthy as possible, including: 1) stopping smoking 2) reducing or even stopping alcohol 3) taking regular exercise such as a brisk walk of at least 30-40 mins per day 4) eating a healthy diet 5) reducing your salt intake 6) keeping a healthy weight 7) watching your weight regularly (a sudden increase in your weight, might reflect an increase in fluid retention in your body) 8) restricting your fluid intake What about emotional wellbeing? Low mood, anxiety and depression are all common in patient living with heart failure. Exercise can often be helpful in improving these symptoms and a graded exercise programme should be done in consultation with your cardiologist. Some patients can also benefit from counselling and in some cases medication may be required. Please discuss these options with your family doctor. Useful websites The following websites can provide useful further information about heart failure including their causes and treatments: British Heart Foundation Pumping Marvellous Cardiomyopathy UK VIEW MORE CONDITIONS

  • About Me | Dr. Raj Khiani

    About Me Dr. Raj Khiani - Consultant Cardiologist in London and Milton Keynes I am an experienced General Cardiologist committed to providing holistic, patient focused care. I believe in making an accurate diagnosis and providing a clear explanation to my patients. I treat the whole patient and discuss the cardiac diagnosis along with its physical and emotional impact on the patients health. I work as a sub-specialist in cardiac devices, arrhythmia and heart failure. I led the arrhythmia service at the Royal Free Hospital between 2016 and 2019 and now concentrate on training medical students, junior doctors and cardiology registrars as well as consultant colleagues in advanced pacing techniques. My current research interests include risk stratification for sudden cardiac death in scleroderma cardiomyopathy, COVID-19 and advanced pacing including optimisation of cardiac resynchronisation therapy and His bundle pacing. I see patients with all common cardiac symptoms including: chest pain, palpitations, shortness of breath and blackouts. I am able to manage all common cardiac disorders including: atrial fibrillation, blood pressure, ischaemic heart disease, heart failure and valvular heart disease. I am registered with all major insurance companies and also see self-funding patients. Qualifications BSc (Hons) MBBS MRCP (UK) FRCP Imperial College, University of London - 1994 Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine, University College London - 1995 Royal College of Physicians, London - 1998 Royal College of Physicians, London - 2011 Experience UnderGraduate Training - Royal Free Hospital, London - 1995 Cardiology Registrar - Papworth Hospital, Cambridge - 2001 Research Fellow - South Manchester University Hospital - 2002 National Training Number - London Deanery, South Thames Rotation - 2004 Specialist Registrar/Senior Registrar in Cardiac devices - Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital - 2007 Specialist Registrar in Cardiology - Royal Sussex County, Brighton - 2004 Cardiology Specialist Registrar - St Georges Hospital, London - 2006 Consultant Cardiologist - Milton Keynes University Hospital and Honorary Consultant Cardiologist at John Radcliffe Hospital - Oxford - 2009 Consultant Cardiologist - Royal Free Hospital School Of Medicine, London - 2015 to Present Back to main page

  • Pacemaker Implantation | Dr. Raj Khiani | Special Interests

    PACEMAKER IMPLANTATION View More Conditions

  • New Technology | Dr. Raj Khiani

    A SHOCKINGLY GOOD SOLUTION Dr. Raj Khiani | Consultant Cardiologist | Publications View Publication ZIO PATCH Dr. Raj Khiani | Consultant Cardiologist | Publications View Publication

  • Zio Ambulatory ECG Patch | Dr. Raj Khiani | Publications

    Zio Ambulatory ECG Patch The Zio ambulatory ECG patch is a new way to continuously record the electrical activity of your heart while you go about your daily routine. ‘Ambulatory’ means that you are not required to be stationary, as is the case during a typical ECG recording in a clinic. Many heart problems are only detectable during activity and will not appear in a brief test in your doctor’s office. The patch is delivered to your home address and inside the box are clear instructions on how to apply it to the chest. The device can record an ECG for between one and fourteen days and, once applied to your chest, you can exercise and shower as normal (after 24 hours). When the recording period is complete, simply remove the patch and return it by post using the box supplied. Your recording will be analysed typically within two days and a report sent to your Cardiologist for review. (Image courtesy of iRhythm Technologies Ltd) Back To New Technology

  • Blackouts | Dr. Raj Khiani | Special Interests

    Blackouts A significant number of people will experience a blackout in their lifetime. In most cases the blackout will not cause any serious harm and will never recur. In a small number of cases the blackout might be caused by a serious medical cause and patients may need specific treatment. What is a blackout A blackout is a transient loss of consciousness for a few seconds or minutes. There are a large number of causes of blackouts but when it is thought to have a cardiac cause it is called cardiac syncope. The causes of blackouts There are a large number of causes of blackout from a simple faint (neurally mediated vasovagal syncope) through to other more serious cardiac causes such as epilepsy, postural hypotension and psychogenic causes. Cardiac syncope is caused by a sudden lack of blood supply to the brain because of a low BP or a problem with the heart rhythm. Do falls represent blackouts There are a large number of causes of falls including mechanical causes, postural instability, low BP and a proportion of elderly people with unexplained falls may be caused by blackouts. When to seek medical attention Most patients with blackouts should see their GP to discuss the blackout. Many patients will have a benign cause of blackout such as a simple faint. However, a proportion of patients with high risk features will then need to be referred for specialist input for example by a neurologist or cardiologist. What tests would be required All patients with blackouts who see a specialist should have a 12 lead ECG recording, other tests which may be required include an echocardiogram, tilt-table test, holter monitor, some patients may require an Implantable loop recorder (ILR) as well as other specialist tests including a cardiac MRI. If the blackouts are thought to be neurological in origin then a MRI of the brain and an EEG may be required. Implantable loop recorder This is a device inserted under the skin in the chest wall on the left hand side. It is inserted under local anaesthetic as a day case procedure. The device is designed to monitor your heart rhythm continuously and is useful for patients who are having syncope to diagnose problems with their heart rhythm which might cause them to blackout. (Image courtesy of Medtronic PLC) VIEW MORE CONDITIONS

  • Blood Pressure | Dr. Raj Khiani

    Blood Pressure Blood pressure is a common term for hypertension (high blood pressure). How should you measure your blood pressure A blood pressure machine can be bought from most high street pharmacies. The cuff should be placed around your upper arm directly onto the skin. The cuff should be the correct size and you should ensure a smooth and comfortable fit. You should rest calmly in a seated position for a couple of minutes before recording your blood pressure, then make two readings a minute apart. You should then record the lowest of the two readings. Typically you would repeat this reading for 7 days recording your blood pressure in the morning and evenings. The average of this 7 day recording would typically be used as a measure of your average blood pressure. What is a normal blood pressure reading A normal blood pressure reading is classified as an average home BP monitoring result less than 135/85. A home average BP greater than 135/85 is classified as stage 1 hypertension and would usually result in lifestyle changes, a discussion a round starting medication to treat hypertension. A blood pressure average reading greater than 150/95 would be classified as stage 2 hypertension and should be treated with lifestyle intervention and drug treatment. In younger patients (those less than 40 years of age) a diagnosis of hypertension would also include further specialist tests to exclude secondary causes of hypertension. What lifestyle interventions can help lower blood pressure A healthy diet, keeping your body weight in the normal range and regular exercise can all help reduce blood pressure. Reducing your alcohol intake and avoiding excessive consumption of coffee or other caffeinated drinks may help. Reducing salt intake and not adding salt to your food at the table can help. Avoiding smoking is also important for patients who have hypertension as these are both risk factors for heart attacks and strokes. VIEW MORE CONDITIONS

  • Shortness of Breath | Dr. Raj Khiani | Special Interests

    Shortness of breath What are the causes of shortness of breath There are a large number of causes to shortness of breath including: anxiety (hyperventilation), lack of physical fitness, being overweight, high blood pressure, anaemia. If these causes have been excluded heart or lung disease commonly cause shortness of breath. The list below is not exhaustive but includes some of the common causes. Please do not try and self-diagnose and seek professional medial advise from your GP if you are concerned about shortness of breath. Heart causes: Heart attack Atypical angina Heart failure Arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation Valvular heart disease Lung causes: COVID-19 Asthma COPD Clot on the lungs (pulmonary embolism) Pneumonia Scarring of the lungs (fibrosis) Lung cancer Pleural effusion(fluids accumulation around the lungs) Pulmonary hypertension Pneumothorax (collapsed lung) When can I experience shortness of breath Cardiac causes of shortness of breath commonly occur during walking or other exertion such as climbing stairs or walking up hills. It can also occur at rest particularly at night when lying flat. What tests are used to investigate the causes of breathlessness Patients with breathlessness will need a full history and examination and may require a variety of tests. These might include some or all of the following: blood tests, chest x-ray, lung function tests, an ECG, echocardiogram or a stress test. Other tests such as a CT scan may also be required depending on the clinical assessment. What should I do if I develop shortness of breath If your shortness of breath is of sudden onset or associated with chest tightness or a heavy feeling in your chest, or if you have pain which spreads to your arms or back you should call 999 and seek urgent medical care in hospital. You might be suffering from a heart attack of other serious heart or lung problem. ​ If your shortness of breath is persistent, especially if associated with a cough, exertion, is worse when lying flat or associated with swelling of your ankles you should contact your GP as you might need further tests and review by a heart or lung specialist. VIEW MORE CONDITIONS

  • CONDITIONS | Dr. Raj Khiani

    Heart Conditions Heart Failure Dr Raj Khiani - Consultant Cardiologist Heart failure is a condition in which the heart’s ability to pump blood and oxygen around the body is impaired. ​ ​ Learn More Palpitations Dr Raj Khiani - Consultant Cardiologist A palpitation is an unpleasant awareness of your heart rhythm. The causes of these symptoms vary from very benign conditions, right through to more serious heart conditions. Learn More Chest Pain Dr Raj Khiani - Consultant Cardiologist This Page is Under Construction ​ ​ ​ ​ Learn More Valvular Heart Disease Dr Raj Khiani - Consultant Cardiologist This Page is Under Construction ​ ​ ​ ​ Learn More Arrhythmia Dr Raj Khiani - Consultant Cardiologist Arrhythmias are abnormalities of the heart rhythm. These may cause symptoms such as palpitations, chest pain, blackouts (syncope), shortness of breath and dizzy spells. Learn More Blackouts Dr Raj Khiani - Consultant Cardiologist A significant number of people will experience a blackout in their lifetime. In a small number of cases the blackout might be caused by a serious medical cause and patients may need specific treatment. Learn More Blood Pressure Dr Raj Khiani - Consultant Cardiologist Blood pressure is a common term for hypertension. A normal blood pressure reading is classified as an average home BP monitoring result less than 135/85. ​ Learn More General Cardiology Dr Raj Khiani - Consultant Cardiologist I have more than 20 years of experience in General Cardiology and have been a Consultant since 2009. I sub-specialise in arrhythmia as well as cardiac device implantation. Learn More Shortness of Breath Dr Raj Khiani - Consultant Cardiologist There are a large number of causes to shortness of breath which include: anxiety (hyperventilation), lack of physical fitness, anaemia, heart failure and high blood pressure. Learn More Pacemaker Implantation Dr Raj Khiani - Consultant Cardiologist Pacemakers are implanted cardiac devices designed to treat dangerous slow heart rhythms. ​ ​ Learn More ICD/CRT Implantation Dr Raj Khiani - Consultant Cardiologist This Page is Under Construction ​ ​ ​ ​ Learn More Back to main page